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Author Topic: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare  (Read 2266 times)

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2011, 02:10:32 PM »
Where do you work, and what do you do?
I work a for small datacomm/telecomm supplier in SE Massachusetts doing an amalgamation of several jobs. Inside sales, deliveries, shipping, receiving, order picking, inventory control, custodial work, and (sometimes) security. There's less than ten employees in the whole company. On a good day I'll be on the road from the time my shift starts at 7:30 until around noon or so when we all break for lunch (yet often work through it, though business has always been sporadic). On a bad day I'm stuck in the office with the boss(es) breathing down my neck because we're not busy enough. Bad days tend to happen more often than not due to the economy, but most especially around major holidays (that's when the president/owner of the company returns from his house in Florida to spend the week before and after most major holidays with his family and friends and whatever associates he has up here; he's an asshole).

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xiv

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2011, 02:18:50 PM »
Do you like anyone you work with?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2011, 02:52:17 PM »
Do you like anyone you work with?
I do. I work with the uncle of a friend of mine (responsible, in a roundabout way, for me getting the job six years ago: another friend had it, he got it because the friend whose uncle works here told him about it, and the friend that worked here was leaving for college and asked if I wanted a full-time job instead of the two part-time jobs I had) and he's hilarious. The boss's son has his moments where he's not that bad, but his sister (thus, boss's daughter) is annoying as hell. There's also a guy who works in another branch (where the boss's daughter is in charge; she may be annoying, but at least she actually does stuff during the day to make the workload easier) that I get along just fine with who's been in many a similar positions as I have these last few years (relationship-wise, as well as the growing resentment of "friends" and family).

Then there's our outside sales rep who does fuck all. He's a pompous ass that we all suspect of taking kick-backs from manufacturers we don't carry as a means of getting us to try to carry them, costing the company money when we don't sell their products anywhere near as often as he's estimated. He was hired one year ago to expand our customer base following the demise of one of our competitors and all he's done is doubled the workload for my friend's uncle and our office manager in terms of quotations needing to be done, thus doubling my overall workload (my friend's uncle has the same job I do but also has seniority, meaning I pull the bitch work between the two of us), and there's been little to no growth whatsoever because of it. He's failing at his job, does barely a quarter of the overall work that I do, and gets paid nearly double. He's also been caught a few times trying to claim personal expenses on the company's dime. It's only a matter of time until he loses his job, or at least that's what the word is around the branches.

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Entragian

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2011, 03:23:36 PM »
On a scale from 1 to 10, how misanthropic are you?






DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2011, 08:29:04 PM »
On a scale from 1 to 10, how misanthropic are you?
Probably closer to a 7 than anything else. I have a genuine disdain for the human race due to reading the horrors of history and witnessing what people will do just because they can. For example, the classic Stamford (I believe) study that took volunteers and divided them into prison guards and prisoners. The end result was that the study, which was intended to be over the course of a month or so, needed to be ended within two weeks due to those chosen to be guards severely abusing their authority from the get-go and those chosen to be prisoners coming dangerously close to a violent revolt. Add to this that only a handful of people I've ever met in my life have not stabbed in the fucking back and practically left me for dead and you get the makings of a pure misanthrope.

I'm only a 7 on my personal scale due to a personal belief that people can, at times, be genuinely kind and caring towards their fellow man, regardless of their reward. Sometimes the knowledge that you helped is its own reward, but all too often aid is given so that those in need will then have to eventually repay those that gave it. 70% miser, 30% optimist/hopeless romantic (but that's another story).

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Eric Rohkar

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2011, 11:26:39 PM »
Who is your father, and I have a follow up...

What does he do?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2011, 06:33:50 AM »
Who is your father, and I have a follow up...

What does he do?
Arnocorps - You Lack Discipline

He's a decent guy who's sacrificed most of his time from when I was still in diapers to even now working one full-time job and a pair of seasonal part-time jobs. He currently works for the Housing Department of a town about 40 minutes north of where he lives (and where I grew up), which is also the town he grew up in, and works part-time doing umpiring during softball season (for both school-age leagues and adult leagues) and working at a hockey rink he's worked at on/off since he was 15 or so depending on the season. I owe my sense of humor and, unfortunately, my short temper to him. He's not a violent person (I honestly think I've had more fights and near-fights than he's had), an amazing grandfather (long story short: my older sister is from a prior relationship from my mother, but my father's never thought of her as anything but his daughter, and her four kids, two of which are not biologically hers but were an ex-boyfriend's that she's had legal custody over for a few years, and my father looks out for all four kids no questions asked), and has no problem giving you help if you ask and he's capable of doing so.

Suffice it to say, though this wasn't part of the question, but I happen to think fairly highly of my father, which seems to be a growing rarity for my generation. He's not without his faults and there aren't issues I still have with aspects of my childhood (namely his constant working as opposed to actually being around when I needed guidance, like towards the end of and right after high school when I saw three friends I grew up with be put six feet under), but he is, overall, a damn decent guy. I wish we had more in common than our last name, genetics, and attitude, but alas: he's always a jock at heart and I've never been.

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xiv

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2011, 10:12:45 AM »
So after your Childish Gambino post in the What are yo LIstening To thread, what would REALLY surprise us to know you listen to/enjoy?

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2011, 01:17:16 PM »
So after your Childish Gambino post in the What are yo LIstening To thread, what would REALLY surprise us to know you listen to/enjoy?
After that? I'm entirely not sure. Tatu is always one that shocks people when I tell them that I know all the words to "All The Things She Said," and I'm not sure many people know that I used to dig on God Lives Underwater (hurray for mid-90's techno).

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Entragian

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2011, 01:19:48 PM »
So after your Childish Gambino post in the What are yo LIstening To thread, what would REALLY surprise us to know you listen to/enjoy?
After that? I'm entirely not sure. Tatu is always one that shocks people when I tell them that I know all the words to "All The Things She Said,"

No shame in that. Actually a pretty catchy song. Just two young girls singing about good old-fashioned lesbian lovin.' *two thumbs up*






Tanya Black

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #35 on: December 21, 2011, 01:10:18 PM »
Did you try to find your presents before your mom could wrap them when you were a kid?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #36 on: December 23, 2011, 09:36:51 AM »
Did you try to find your presents before your mom could wrap them when you were a kid?
Sometimes, because it wasn't hard to do. She hid them in my father's closet. Bad place to hide presents from a 12-year-old, considering I knew that the top shelf had his collection of porn hidden in the back behind some shoeboxes.

NOTE: Pleasure So Deep was the first adult film I ever saw. It was so late 70's/early 80's that it hurts. Hair everywhere. EVERYWHERE.

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CadreCross

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #37 on: December 27, 2011, 03:27:21 PM »
Are you aware that your reply in Rob's computer thread gave me horrible flashbacks to Hackers

.... you asshole? :P


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DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #38 on: December 27, 2011, 09:52:21 PM »
Are you aware that your reply in Rob's computer thread gave me horrible flashbacks to Hackers

.... you asshole? :P
Are you aware that the proper thread to comment upon said reference to a gloriously 90's piece of schlock featuring a future superstar was that thread itself?

Hackers exists, alongside the somewhat underrated family-friendly action flick Masterminds, as a time capsule of before Hollywood had any idea whatsoever what a hacker actually did. The closest to legitimate hacking we've seen in cinema has been The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and that's because it was files being viewed rather than somehow hacking into the backdoor of a secret game system via joystick or having random physics equations float around in a purple space.

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xiv

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #39 on: December 28, 2011, 04:35:02 PM »
did you throw up your horns at any time because of my post count?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #40 on: December 28, 2011, 06:04:35 PM »
did you throw up your horns at any time because of my post count?
...yes. I also take a picture of my mileage any time the NotB shows up and saved a receipt from Dunkin' Donuts one morning that came to $6.66.

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xiv

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #41 on: December 28, 2011, 08:28:17 PM »
How many instruments do you own?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #42 on: December 28, 2011, 09:35:54 PM »
How many instruments do you own?
Type: one. I'm a guitarist, thus I own guitars.

How many guitars? Technically four, at the moment, but one is at my folks' house since it is awful and I merely learned on it, one is at my friend/jamming partner Tony's place (he's the other guitarist in the video of my old band I posted in the "What are you listening to" thread, for reference), and two are in my room.

The guitar at my folks' house is a Fender Squier Stratocaster, black body with white pickguard, and covered in graffiti and stickers, including placing various Sharpie markings on it to make it appear to be a cock with a hairy ballsack. The term, at least up here, is referred to as "hogging." It is, technically, my second guitar, as my first was a cheap K-Mart special acoustic that my father's parents bought me for my birthday when I was 11.

My second actual guitar, but my first REAL one, was a Hamer Explorer with a red/orange sunburst design. I bought it with cashed in savings bonds on my 16th birthday, wanting an Explorer due to my then diehard admiration of James Hetfield (whose trademark guitar was a white Gibson Explorer with "EET FUK" written in black Sharpie along the body). It still plays well but is awfully crisp and clear no matter the tone I craft on my cab. I primarily use it for recording what few leads I've played and writing/recording new material as its brightness allows for the notes to be much less muddled when listening back to what I've recorded.

My pride and joy, though, is my Bronze series BC Rich Warlock. It is, technically, my second one due to an interior wiring issue that would have cost the same amount to fix as to just purchase a new one (they're ridiculously cheap for being as good of guitars as they are, usually carrying a price tag of $250 or so, which is dirt for a name brand anything), but its centralized weight, thicker-than-average neck, and wider spacing between strings makes it a breeze to play the fast and furious stuff I picked up a guitar wanting to play in the first place. It always has a nice bottom-heavy tone, too, and it sounds beautiful clean. My only wish is that I ponied up a bit more cash to get an NJ Series Warlock, as the bodies are more solid, a little lighter, and whammy bars come standard. Whammy bars are "meh," overall, but a requirement for divebombs, which is a major basis of all metal leads post-Hell Awaits.

And then there's my ultimate beater, my Bronze series BC Rich Beast. This was one I bought solely for the body design over anything else due to...well, look at it. It's so off-kilter and just flatout disgusting looking while still reserving a bit of streamline class that it commands attention. The weight, unfortunately, is off-center and great, forcing me to really bend my knees when playing, and the top "wing" of the body causes me to place my arm differently, leading, in all actuality, to a developing shoulder problem due to my damned incessant playing of it regardless of its poor design. I've contemplated selling it before, but I bought it with a bent neck (three full set ups, lowered action, thinner gauge strings, and leaning it at a 45-degree angle with the fretboard facing the wall has helped straighten it enough, but it's still bent more than is anywhere near preferable) and I doubt I'd be able to get anything more than $50 for it due to my having also played it for years. I could, of course, just switch out the neck (I did it with my second Warlock as it had the trademark BC Rich "horned" headstock as opposed to the "hockey stick" one in the pictured above, whereas my first Warlock has the "hockey stick" one due to the neck being lighter and easier to tune/re-string), but that presents a whole other mess of issues unto itself (like finding the right size neck since a Beast's neck is a different size than a Warlock's).

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CadreCross

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #43 on: December 29, 2011, 05:26:42 AM »
Drez, what's your opinion of Ensiferum?


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DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #44 on: December 29, 2011, 07:46:55 AM »
Drez, what's your opinion of Ensiferum?
They're not bad, but I prefer the more upbeat folk metal types: Korpiklaani, Finntroll, Turisas, etc. I'm not a big black metal fan, to be honest, and I know they're more "kvlt" than the usual folk metal acts I enjoy. I don't mind them, though.

In fact, I think the only folk metal I truly hate is Arkona, but that's more because my ex-girlfriend introduced them to me (after I introduced folk metal as a whole to her...fucking pseudo-hippie bitches) than anything else. I'm actively skipping Korpiklaani's return to Massachusetts due to Arkona opening for them and the possibility, however rare, of running into her.

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CadreCross

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #45 on: January 29, 2012, 01:39:56 AM »
Because reading back over your htread has confused the hell out of me:

Could you give a layperson like me a brief Cliff's Notes rundown of the subgenres of metal? I feel ignorant for not knowing the difference between them. :/

Follow-up: do the distinctions between the sub-genres mean something, or is it like dance, where the multitude of sub-sub-sub-genres mostly exists to make people feel superior? :P


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DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2012, 08:29:02 AM »
Because reading back over your htread has confused the hell out of me:

Could you give a layperson like me a brief Cliff's Notes rundown of the subgenres of metal? I feel ignorant for not knowing the difference between them. :/
You are asking for such a major fucking lesson that it's ridiculous. I can give you the basic gist of the major ones, as well as a band or two who exemplify the style.

Proto-Metal
Maybe not truly metal, maybe 100% fucking metal, but this label can be applied to any bands from the mid 60's to early 70's whose influence on metal can be righteously felt. Cream, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, MC5, the Who, and others can be considered that for their influence on it, but the big ones are obviously Black Sabbath (duh), Led Zeppelin, Uriah Heep, Deep Purple, and Steppenwolf.

NWOBHM
Often pronounced "new bomb," it refers more to the era of metal bands than it does a certain style (though there's definitely major similarities between each of the bands). NWOBHM stands for the "New Wave of British Heavy Metal," which was the second wave of metal bands after metal "died" for the first time in the mid-70's (it never died, it's just some of the bands split and others evolved as bands are naturally going to do). Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Motorhead, Saxon, Venom, and Diamond Head are the big ones.

Thrash Metal
Take NWOBHM, load it up with a whole hell of a lot of punk rock DIY ethics, speed it up, get it shitfaced plastered and/or high as a kite (usually on either cocaine or amphetamines), and then get it fucking pissed off. What you have here? It's called thrash metal, and it's going to come after you and your Motley Crue listening friends to beat the shit out of you. Possibly the most important (and easily the most commercially successful) of all the true sub-genres of metal, thrash is personified by staccato vocal delivery, fast dual-guitar assaults, double bass drumming, and the rise of shredding as a lead guitar technique. Shredding, if you didn't know, was popularized by Eddie Van Halen, but thrash guitarists took it to a whole new fucking level that wouldn't get touched until power metal and neoclassical really took hold in the later 80's. 80's Metallica, 80's Megadeth, Anthrax, Slayer, Exodus, Kreator, Sodom, pre-Chaos AD Sepultura, Testament...all magnificent thrash acts that perfectly encapsulate the attitude and different stylizations of the genre. Another pair of bands to include here are Celtic Frost and Bathory, neither of whom were truly thrash but had plenty of thrash in them, and they both influenced death and black metal a great deal.

Death Metal
Thrash made more dangerous, angrier, and even more technical. This grew to be the most popular sub-genre of metal in the mid 90's and is often laughed about by non-fans for how its vocalists growl as opposed to sing, leading to most mockeries of metal being about it having "Cookie Monster vocals" and whatnot. Also, death metal may be the most diverse sub-genre of metal as a whole, as two bands can sound remarkably different and yet share one or two small similarities in their sound and both be considered death metal. Contrary to popular belief, though, death metal is NOT named after the band Death, but rather early pioneer Possessed via their 1984 demo tape Death Metal. Death, however, played a major role in the formation of sound and style and aesthetics and lyrical tone, which is often why Chuck Schuldiner (guitarist/vocalist for Death from its formation in the mid 80's until his demise in 2001) is widely acknowledged as "the father of death metal." The sub-genre added melody in the early to mid 90's and harmony on top of that to solid commercial success as its deep underground counterparts increased the ferocity, technicality, and overall incomprehensiveness of the style, creating melodic death metal (often referred to as "Gothenburg" due to many of its practitioners - In Flames, Dark Tranquility, At the Gates, and others - hailing from Gothenburg, Sweden) and brutal death metal (Suffocation, Disgorge, Lividity, and others). Progressive music also made its impact on death metal, leading to bands like Opeth and Disillusion. Overall, bands to check out not listed prior to this sentence include Carcass (be careful, though, as their first few LPs sound NOTHING like their last two), Cannibal Corpse, Nile, Krisiun, Autopsy, Morbid Angel, Origin, and Entombed.

Black Metal
If Venom was "In League With Satan" just to get a rise out of the Christian right and early 80's metal pioneers Mercyful Fate found frontman King Diamond performing black magic rituals as a means of publicity, then nobody told the founders of black metal this. They took it kinda fucking seriously. Here, just read this article on all of the stuff pulled off in Norway alone. Black metal, though, is possibly the most thought-out sub-genre of metal as a whole, but also the least fulfilling for non-fans due to its desire to be cold and uncomforting for listeners. Bands to check out include Mayhem, Darkthrone, Immortal, Marduk, Burzum (early output only, as later output is more synthesizer-based darkwave), and even "poseur bands" like Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth. Going back to Bathory and Venom for a second, Venom's album Black Metal and their Satanic theatrics gave the genre its name, but Bathory's overall sound and allegiance to Norse folklore is what gave black metal its style. Venom named it, Bathory taught it, and Mayhem and Darkthrone and Immortal truly created it.

Power Metal
See, at some point in the mid to late 80's, musicians got together and decided that metal was just getting too damn serious and violent. They remembered the musicianship of bands like Yes, Rush, and Emerson, Lake, & Palmer, and they wanted to bring that style of amazing technicality to metal while keeping it all within the same values set forth by Iron Maiden and Judas Priest. Thus? Power metal, the go-to metal for nerds everywhere who couldn't really identify with Paul Baloff (original Exodus frontman) talking about going out onto the streets of San Francisco and beating down anybody wearing a Poison t-shirt or with those crazy Norwegian folks burning down churches, but could identify with Tolkien referenes and talk of historical battlefields. That's not to say that you need to be a nerd to enjoy power metal, though, because musically? It's the most accessible and easily the catchiest of all forms of metal. Helloween, Rhapsody, Hammerfall, Firewind, Fates Warning, Stratovarius, and even tripe like Dragonforce (who, by the way, most "REAL" power metal fans loathe) fall under power metal.

-Core
A funny thing happened after thrash combined punk and metal in the early 80's: punks and metalheads really started listening to each other's music. A lot. When a metal band decided to add more punk to its style or a punk band decided to get better musically and start playing metal? The result was known as "crossover," and usually referred to bands like SOD (Stormtroopers of Death: a side-project for Anthrax members Scott Ian and Charlie Benante with former Anthrax bassist Dan Lilker and MOD frontman/former Anthrax roadie Billy Milano), DRI (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles, best known as the inventors of the blastbeat), and early Suicidal Tendencies (prior to the major addition of funk that they're best known for today). Then, crossover kinda morphed into what's known as modern hardcore thanks to hardcore acts like Biohazard basically playing a more groove-oriented form of crossover in the early 90's, which is where acts like Hatebreed and Terror really steam from. "METALCORE" was born in the mid 90's thanks to acts like Earth Crisis and Pro-Pain, who took on the metal playing techniques of thrash and really threw them head-first into the more groove-ified hardcore sound of the era, and "melodic metalcore" took hold in the early 00's thanks to a trio of bands from the Boston/Providence scene that combined the metalcore sound of the mid 90's with the Gothenburg sound of the same era: Shadows Fall, Killswitch Engage, and Unearth. Drop the "melodic" word now, since most metalcore bands focus on melody, and you've got the majority of the past decade as far as "mainstream" heavy music goes.

Groove Metal
Also sometimes called "post-thrash," this is what metal evolved (or devolved, depending on who you ask) in the 90's. Pantera. Prong. Chaos AD and Roots era Sepultura. White Zombie. Basically, bands took the mosh breaks of thrash songs, which were usually mid-tempo when compared to the breakneck speed the rest of the songs were played at, and built songs off of that along with a solid blues-influenced hook. Industrial also found its way in here and there, but the focus was on the groove riff and blues and classic rock influence. This, unfortunately, led to "nu metal" in the late 90's/early 00's, which we're all still suffering the horrible effects of.

Doom Metal
Take Black Sabbath and make it moodier, angrier, and crunchier. Up the musicianship, make the vocals sometimes even more out of place, and build tension. Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride, and Solitude Aeturnus are the acts to check out and see if you're into doom metal. Personally? I'm not much of a fan (though I'm liking Paradise Lost the more I listen to them), but chalk that up to me cutting my teeth on the Big Four, Nile, and White Zombie, so I tend to like heavier and faster fare.

And yes, that's as succinct a breakdown I can do of the BIG scenes. There's also sludge (which is doom metal, progressive rock, and groove metal jumbled together with big crunchy stoner rock production; Mastodon, Acid Bath, Baroness, Wolves in the Throne Room, etc.), folk metal (sometimes called "death polka" as a joke, because the genre itself is based often on northern European folk music, which usually comes to some form of polka-sounding tunes, and basic metal riffing; Korpiklaani, Finntroll, and Turisas are favorites), and grindcore (a blend of death metal and hardcore punk that has incorporated lots of thrash over the years but keeps its songs simple, down to 2-3 riffs per song and songs ranging in the 1-2 minute range on average; Pig Destroyer, early Napalm Death, Terrorizer, and Cephalic Carnage will give you a good range of grindcore acts to check out), but they're not as BIG of players as the above.
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Follow-up: do the distinctions between the sub-genres mean something, or is it like dance, where the multitude of sub-sub-sub-genres mostly exists to make people feel superior? :P
They definitely mean something, but the more ridiculous the prefix to the sub-genre? The more likely its marketing. Sometimes the phrasing actually means something, though. Take, for example, blackened deathrash. "Deathrash" is a shortened form of "death/thrash" that's used sparingly, which means that it's a blend of death metal and thrash metal (usually meaning that it's thrash riffs with death vocals and multiple tempo changes as opposed to constantly 150-200 bpm as thrash is often set to), but the "blackened" prefix means that there is an overall element of black metal in it, usually the atmosphere and poor production of black metal to create said atmosphere.

However, be wary of bands that describe themselves as something like "progressive slamming folk grind," though, because that likely means that the people in it may enjoy the works of Dream Theater, Dying Fetus, Arkona, and Exit-13, but the sound itself is likely just grind with occasional breaks.

That's not say every band who throws together seemingly random sub-genre styles into what they call themselves is just bullshitting you, though, because sometimes it's absolutely true. The term "Christraping" is usually in reference to black metal and comes from the band Marduk (who have a song called "Christraping Black Metal," naturally), but it also means any form of metal where a hatred of Christ and Christianity as a whole is a major lyrical focal point. "Slamming" is in reference to the breakdowns/beatdowns/mosh breaks of death and grind songs, meaning that a major portion of the song is usually designed to invoke mosh pits ("stomping" means the same thing, mind you, and the two terms are often interchangeable). Most of the time it's marketing, but sometimes it makes perfect sense.

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CadreCross

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2012, 05:21:48 PM »
Drez, I love you man. That was way more comprehensive than I was expecting.

So where would a group like Nightwish fall? Sorta power/folk? Or are they not considered "real" metal?


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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2012, 06:56:57 PM »
Operatic power, which is (obviously) and off-SHOOT of power metal (along with neoclassical).

http://www.metal-archives.com

That's a good site to discover new bands and find out about old ones. Every band has the "similar artists" tab, and most of them are filled out with similar bands. You can even search by sub-genre!

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2012, 08:33:58 PM »
So, is Primus really as undefinable as we they've become?