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Author Topic: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare  (Read 1698 times)

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2012, 09:36:30 PM »
No. They're a jam band that dabbles in noise rock. To say any band is "undefinable" is fucking ridiculous, especially when they fit well within the parameters of both a jam band and a noise rock band, but border the two fairly evenly.

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Eric Rohkar

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2012, 11:26:15 PM »
Can you define Jam Band and Noise Rock? I've heard those labels, but I have no idea what they mean.

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2012, 07:03:40 AM »
Lifted right from the Wikipedia article (and I agree with it)...
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Jam bands are musical groups whose albums and live performances relate to a fan culture that originated with the 1960s group Grateful Dead and continued in the 1990s with bands like Phish.[1] The performances of these bands often feature extended musical improvisation ("jams") over rhythmic grooves and chord patterns and long sets of music that cross genre boundaries.[2]
Take bands like the Grateful Dead, Phish, and the String Cheese Incident, then throw some solid bit of funk into there via Parliament Funkadelic and the Isley Brothers? You get Primus.

But then that doesn't quite describe them, because they definitely like to make some noise rock right it all, too. Noise rock is (again, via the Wikipedia entry)...
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Noise rock (also known as noise punk[1]) describes a style of post-punk rock music that became prominent in the 1980s.[1][2] Noise rock makes use of the traditional instrumentation and iconography of rock, but incorporates atonality and especially dissonance, and also frequently discards usual songwriting conventions.[2][3]
Melt-Banana, the Jesus Lizard, Unsane. Those are noise rock outfits. It's basically sludge metal without the all-out ballsiness of it all or the ultra low-end and, in fact, influenced the growth of sludge as a whole.

So what happens if you mix the Isley Brothers, the Jesus Lizard, the Grateful Dead, and overall absurdity? You get Les Claypool and you get Primus.

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Eric Rohkar

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2012, 08:55:22 AM »
Define music.

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #54 on: January 31, 2012, 09:07:59 AM »
Organized noise.

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #55 on: January 31, 2012, 10:15:13 AM »
Do you prefer the Star Wars cantina music or smooth jazz?





also, where does the name "Drezzy" come from?


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DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #56 on: January 31, 2012, 10:24:07 AM »
Do you prefer the Star Wars cantina music or smooth jazz?
If we're talking original trilogy and not the SE crap...cantina. Oh hell yes, cantina. Smooth jazz makes me think of being at the dentist.
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also, where does the name "Drezzy" come from?
My real name is Andrew. One of the nicknames for Andrew is Drew, as you all know. My best friend in middle school, Jason (he fedded for a little while, handling Cristoph Doom primarily), was nicknamed Twiggy due to his resemblance of Marilyn Manson's bassist at the time, and it was eventually switched to Twiggz after me calling him that. I wanted a nickname besides "Drew" or "Andy." Darren Drozdov's accident happened and was fresh on my mind. Drew + Droz = Drez. Drezzy.

It just stuck once I used it as a handle. There's still a few IRL friends from middle and high school who call me Drezzy, but not many.

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Eric Rohkar

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #57 on: January 31, 2012, 12:03:52 PM »
Have you ever been referred to as some variation on a pastry as a pet name?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #58 on: January 31, 2012, 03:02:23 PM »
Of course. I think anybody who's dated somebody long-term has. "Love muffin" was the go-to, but I've also been referred to as "sex cookie" before.

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Eric Rohkar

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #59 on: January 31, 2012, 07:02:18 PM »
Sex cookie is pretty great.

Why do you think I ask you more questions than I do any other ask thread?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #60 on: January 31, 2012, 08:23:50 PM »
Because you, too, are a metalhead, and we have similar tastes in music and, apparently, some life views.

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2012, 12:46:26 AM »
Your favorite horror movies?

Let's say a top five, with descriptions as to why you liked them so much.






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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #62 on: May 14, 2012, 08:11:54 AM »
There be spoilers ahead, but you should be ashamed of yourself if you haven't seen these anyway. It's taken me a while to even think these up and to properly give them justice, so here we go:

Honorable Mentions:
-The Evil Dead for accomplishing so much with such a low budget and not a single member of the cast being particularly good at acting. Campbell eventually became fantastic as being the smarmy douche we all love him as and the girl playing his sister isn't too bad, but nothing about this movie screams "good acting." What it does scream, however, is "amazing direction," "chilling atmosphere," and "a love for the genre." Anybody who ever asks why Sam Raimi is as beloved as he is needs to check this out and remember that Raimi STILL admires and remembers his humble, no-budget horror roots.
-Return of the Living Dead for daring to mix chilling black comedy with splatterfest horror. Amazing SFX, killer soundtrack, and the cast gels perfectly together. Its quotability is virtually unmatched and after watching the recent (as in last two years) documentary on it? This was a genuine labor of love from the late Dan O'Bannon and half of the cast. Fun fact: Brian Peck, who plays Scuz (the mohawked punk with the trenchcoat and the switchblade), also does a number of uncredited SFX puppeteering, voice work, and zombie work. He's also the one who put together and narrated the excellent documentary of it that came out recently due solely to his love of horror and being involved in a classic like ROTLD.
-Alien because, well...watch it. It started a massively popular franchise and still, to this day, is creepy and chilling and terrifying. This was also the movie that solidified the belief that sci-fi and horror pictures could be A-list films and not just B-grade fare and, of course, began the film career of the goddess known as Sigourney Weaver.

5. Poltergeist
In a three-word phrase, "face peeling scene." Overall, though, there's nothing about this movie that isn't virtually perfect. The casting of the parents was great, James Karen as the shady real estate developer was magnificent, and the false finish of the movie must have grabbed people by the balls when it was new and not let them go. The best part? This movie's PG. Very little blood or gore at all and just amazing atmosphere with enough jump scares to keep you anxious.

4. In the Mouth of Madness
Carpenter's last great movie and as perfect an example of Lovecraft worship as any. This movie is dripping with atmosphere and requires multiple viewings to pick everything up. There's parts of it that don't work quite as well as Carpenter probably wanted them to, which is why it's not #1, such as the pacing early on: it can be quite dull if you're not in the mood to watch it. Trust me, though, this whole movie reads "mind fuck" in such a glorious way, and if you're a fan of Lovecraft? All of the nods to his stories and his lore will have you smiling in glee.

3. Dawn of the Dead (original)
I love the remake of this one, too, but the original works in a subtle manner so that the true horror of the situation doesn't hit you until you're done with it all. The acting and the special effects may not be as great as other Romero pictures (I'd say Land has the best acting and Day the best SFX), but think about it: the whole world is crumbling to shit and all we can do is fight over who deserves the Kashmir sweater. There are things that literally want to eat and devour you but you're too full of yourself and your non-essential belongings to do anything about it. That's the ultimate theme in most zombie horror that most zombie flicks after 1985 or so miss: the situation could be easily contained if we all sat down and took a good hard look at the problem, but we're so fucking petty and fiercely individualistic that we'd rather try to assign blame than get anything done. The bittersweet ending works in its favor, as the survivors escape the hell they built for themselves as it crumbles to nothing...but you just know that they'll only find more hell wherever they land. It's that kind of horror that doesn't get made much anymore where the happy ending is just a cheap masking of the real hell that the future holds.

2. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Again, the original. The remake has two good scenes in the whole thing. This one? Gritty as hell, low budget, and so eerily believable that you may not want to go on a road trip anytime soon near regions with "backwoods folk" around. The first time I saw this in full I had to desperately try to keep myself awake (it was on Cinemax or HBO at 2 in the morning, or something ridiculous like that), but once the revelation of just how many people are a part of the family hits? Oh MAN does it become the single most suspenseful and tense 20 minutes of cinema history. Another bittersweet ending, too, as the heroine (well, "final survivor," really) may escape with just minor physical injuries, but there's no doubt that she's ruined for life with how she reacts to being carted off in the back of the truck, laughing maniacally while crying the whole while.

1. John Carpenter's The Thing
Imagine that you're in a secluded region with a dozen or so other people. You trust them with your life on a daily basis thanks to the harsh weather and terrain that's outside, weather that makes it so cold you could freeze to death in your sleep if your heater breaks down. Now imagine that you're not sure if ANYBODY is who they say they are anymore because there's this grotesque beast that's insanely hard to kill and can morph itself into looking like any living organism it wants to. You've already seen the aftermath of what it can do and now it's working its way into everybody you give two fucks about. This goes beyond any of the Body Snatchers routines because this thing doesn't just scream at you and try to subdue you: it transforms into something nightmares are made of, something wholly inhuman and barely resembling a living being, and then eviscerates you in a heartbeat. It can't even be frozen to death because it just goes back into hibernation. That's the true horror of the ending, too: you're not sure if Childs, the only other survivor besides main character MacReady, is human or alien, just as Childs is unsure if MacReady is human or alien. Nobody is sure of anything, not even the viewer. Ultimately? There's a major possibility that the thing is just asleep once more in the cold, waiting for another group of people to try to escape Antarctica and take over the world, one cell at a time...

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #63 on: May 14, 2012, 03:27:14 PM »
I just wanted to say that, because of my own insecurities and social awkwardness, I have this feeling that you think I don't like you.

I definitely respect the shit out of you, and enjoy you commenting and discussing everything we have been discussing. I'm not trying to pick on you, and if it comes off like that, I'm taking out some of my own issues on you and that's not something I should do. We don't see eye-to-eye on one issue, but, shit, we're human. We never will see eye-to-eye on everything. Like my girlfriend and I not seeing eye-to-browneye on anal.

Anyways. Not a question, but something I knew you'd read and something I did want to do publically because I felt like I was ostracizing myself with some of my comments (including in the MMA thread).

Love, Peace and Chicken Grease.

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #64 on: May 14, 2012, 04:47:49 PM »
I didn't get that vibe at all, actually. We've been talking about some matters which are definitely touchy subjects and it's not like you've outright ragged on me, just my position on things. In short: no prob, dawg.

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Mason Pierce

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #65 on: May 14, 2012, 06:42:37 PM »
What's your take on metal "concept" albums, and if you had to select one that really stands out to you, which would it be?

DrezzyF2T

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Re: Ask a misanthropic metalhead if you dare
« Reply #66 on: May 14, 2012, 10:37:22 PM »
Depending on what you mean by "concept," I think they're just as great or as flawed as any other album. There are two kinds of concept albums: one where every song relates to one central theme and one where it tells a story as if a play were unfolding.

For the former, Iced Earth's Horror Show (where each song, save for power ballad "Ghosts of Freedom," is about classic horror films) is a good choice, as are God Dethroned's Passiondale (where each song relates to the Battle of Paschendale, the bloodiest battle of World War I) and Pig Destroyer's Phantom Limb (where each song relates to madness and psychopathy in some manner).

For the latter, the "proper" form of a concept album, Dream Theater's Metropolis Pt. II: Scenes From a Memory stands head and shoulders above all else (and I'm not even a big DT fan), but the majority of King Diamond's output deserves a mention, as do Fear Factory's Obsolete (somewhat unique for the story being written after the songs, but the story is also told through the songs themselves in terms of tone and attitude) and Nevermore's Dreaming Neon Black (which is a personal story about singer Warrell Dane's ex-lover that disappeared after joining a cult, never to be heard from again). A good portion of Gwar's output can also be considered concept albums due to their being a story associated with the majority of them, but most notably America Must Be Destroyed (where Grambo and her army of censors try to destroy Gwar for the betterment of mankind), Beyond Hell (where the world's armies finally kill Gwar via nuclear assault, leading them to travel through and conquer Hell itself...before waking up and realizing it was all a crack-induced dream), and Lust in Space (where the band finally ventures off of Earth before realizing that this piece of shit planet is their true home).

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